Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘boston’

“Ukuhamba Kukufunda” – Andrew’s Final Post

Today is my last day as the summer Enrollment Coordinator at Interstudy. It’s been a fantastic 10 weeks working here in Boston. Being able to witness first hand the other side of study abroad and has given me a greater appreciation for the experience I had with Interstudy in 2010 studying in South Africa because of the legwork done by those in this office that make it all possible.

Now, before I get all misty eyed from the realization that this is my last day in the office, I felt it appropriate to share my somewhat worldly wisdom to those who take the time to read the Interstudy blog. So here’s my list of things to live by. Whether it is during a semester/year abroad, traveling, working, or recently graduating (as I just did) I hope this list will help bring some insight into what I believe to be some true necessities to know and practice. Read more

Advertisements

Great American (Irish, or South African) Pastime

It’s opening day at Fenway Park in Boston, and there’s a buzz of excitement as a new season of America’s greatest pastime begins. Sure the home team isn’t doing so well yet, but any true Red Sox fan would tell you, “they’ll get better”. Baseball holds a special place in American history, as does Fenway Park itself, which is celebrating it’s 100th anniversary this year.

I asked two of Interstudy‘s Resident Staff members in Ireland and South Africa about favorite pastimes in their countries. Here’s a look at what you should expect to see on TV at a local pub near campus: Read more

Alumni Spotlight: On the Radio

Interstudy Alumni come from around the country – from big schools in big cities to small schools in even smaller towns. Enrolling directly at a university abroad through Interstudy means that our students can also study a wide range of disciplines – from engineering to the arts, and everything in between.

One Interstudy Alum, Nicholas Petricca, a graduate of Kenyon College in Gambier, OH, has been making waves since his semester at Goldsmiths, University of London….radio waves. Read more

T-10 days

With just over a week until my departure for London, most of my thoughts are still on planning: will my credits transfer appropriately? Is my suitcase the right size? How many pairs of shoes should I take?

In the off chance I let myself actually think about what life in London is going to be like, I hit a wall. Combinations of old Mary Kate and Ashley movies, postcards from childhood friends and visits to the British goods store in my town flood my vision, forming an awfully stereotypic idea of what the place must be like, so I’d rather stick to thinking about my goals for the semester. I have plenty of aspirations, I want to find a little underground music venue and see some band before they get big, I want visit as many museums as I can, but mostly, I want to know what it’s like to be a student somewhere other than the United States

All that said, a few panging worries also cross my mind when I think about the reality of the coming months. I’m worried that I’ll get lost in such a large city. I’m worried I won’t make friends living by myself and I’m worried that I’ll miss my family and friends in Boston. But judging from others who have gone before me, even the disasters in a once-in-a-lifetime experience can make the most positive memories.

Slowly but Surely

It is now officially one week since I’ve landed on the Emerald Isle and what a jewel it really is. To be frank, I don’t think I’ve ever been to a place quite like this- a culture shock indeed. My journey began with my departure from home. Dad, Lucia, Nikki, and Brendin accompanied me to Boston’s Logan International Airport and we said our teary-eyed goodbyes at the security gate. I am very surprised at how well I handled myself in all my traveling, despite a few more tears on the flight while listening to a music playlist I had made for my father. I must say the excitement as the plane slowly landed on the runway in Dublin was extremely thrilling. There, I met Coleman (my Interstudy advisor) and Christine (another America student studying at NUIM). The three of us quickly bonded while we tried to strategically fit 6 over-sized suitcases, 1 heavy duffle bag, 1 rubbermaid storage container, and 2 larger carry-ons into Coleman’s tiny car. If not for my conveniently tiny size and ability to squeeze into small spaces, I might still be at the airport. Upon our arrival on campus, Coleman guided us around the beautiful south campus and traditionally modern north campus of NUIM. Unfortunately, meanwhile, the immediate change was a bit too much for my body to handle- as the first couple of days, I saw more of the apartment as I would have liked to due to some jet lag and nerves. Luckily, with a bit of rest and some fresh air while sight-seeing, I was able to quickly recuperate. It is then that we met up with Coleman and an Interstudy student studying at Trinity for a bite to eat and some browsing in Dublin. Read more

Breaking Records in Boston

Yesterday marked the 113th annual Boston Marathon and it was a beautiful day for a run. The marathon isn’t only about the runners though. Before the start of the road race, the Boston Marathon also hosts the men’s and women’s wheelchair division of the race which travels on the same path as the runners – including Boston‘s infamous Heartbreak Hill. Imagine the arm strength it must take to make that climb! This year, none other than a South African was breaking records in Boston in the men’s wheelchair division. Ernst Van Dyk, who lives near Stellenbosch, South Africa, won his ninth Boston Marathon this year. Along with his impressive accomplishments on the road, Van Dyk studied Sports Science at the Stellenbosch University, one of interstudy‘s many program sites in South Africa. (image care of Boston.com)